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>>> hello and welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. i'm kelly evans. japan's central bank boosts assets by another $120 billion. boj says it will discuss raising its inflation target next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign
in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john boehner's plan b failed. this all turned red and this is where we ended. the nikkei 225 coming back from that huge rally that we have seen over the last five weeks shedding 1%. the exporters hurt here because the dollar/yen was lower. it has regained some ground in the last few hours or so. the kospi shedding about 1%. blame politicians in the u.s. and blame heavyweight samsung. this accounts for some 20% of market value on the kospi index. down 4%. that hurt the broader markets. this is, of course, because eu regulators are poised to excuse samsung of breaking competition rules and filing competition patent lawsuits against samsung. greater chinese markets, shanghai more isolated from global happenings and fiscal cliff
kurdish town is still trying to identify the scores of people who died. to japan now, where the authorities are trying to figure out how tunnel collapsed on sunday, killing at least nine people. huge concrete slabs in the tunnel smashed on to cars. that started a fire on the main route from tokyo to central japan. we report now on that story. >> only this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought -- early this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought from the tunnel. last came a small delivery truck. the driver had been trapped, but alive. by the time rescuers got to him, he was dead. the collapsed tunnel lies deep in the mountains of central japan, just to the north of mount fuji. it is part of the expressway that links tokyo to central and western japan. the tunnel itself is nearly 5 kilometers or 3 miles long. engineers are trying to work out what went wrong. what caused the huge concrete ceiling segments to suddenly give away and crashed to the road below 0-- and crash to the road below? and why had the tunnel past the city in best --
totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churned out a liberty ship in a record four and a half days. that's faster than most of my students can write one of their semester papers. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technol
in tokyo, as well, to assess what options the bank of japan really has. policy will not be dictated by market opinion. we'll take stock of britain's progress towards deficit reduction, this ahead of the chancellor's autumn statement. senior fellow for international economics. will the numbers live up to the expectations. meanwhile, over in ghi narks the mainland's factories are crank out more goods at the fastest pace in month. >> chinese factories appear to be recovering. the hsbc pmi, a private gauge of manufacturing, and the government's official pmi, both show a steady improvement for the industry in november. the hsbc pmi final reading came in at 50.5, the quickest expansion in over a year. the industry saw a pick up in new orders as well as stronger exports thanks in part to christmas demand. the concern is about the the unevenness of the recovery. the sub indices for employment as well as small and medium sized companies ticked downwards and that suggested to some that the recovery is mainly led by investment in state-owned enterprises. a bigger worry is about the outlook for
to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into where we are with this global market. more now on the global trading day in europe. 5-4 advances just about outpace decliners on the dow jones stoxx 600. most european stocks were up yesterday. the dax up 13 points. the dax, second highest close of the year, still up 27.5% for the year. right now, the ftse sound, the cac kron, closed at a fresh 52-week high. and the ftse is up 13 points despite falls from italian banks. let's show you where we are as far as the bond yields are concerned. we just check in. italian yields, 4.4% on the year. we'll show you the twos and tens, as well. i'll give you more on how that compares to where we closed yesterday. so the two-year, that's the low where we were yesterday. 10-year spanish yields, 5.581%. two-year yield, 2.35%, kind of where we were yesterday, too. and they're continue to go appreciateslide slightly from yesterday's close. as far as currency markets, 1.2880 was the two-week low on
cac up 11%. thailand up 43%. japan up 6%. year to date, the usa is up over 12%. that ain't bad. let's bring in our pal, jim iuor iuorio. you know, jim, it's turning out to be a very good year and it's turning out to be a very good year on a global basis. >> no doubt about it. but let's break it down. japan's stock market has rallied huge because of promise of liquidity injections and doveishness. the same thing can be said for europe and for the u.s. around the globe, everyone's squeezing interest rates and forcing money to seek yield wherever it can. it could have followthrough in japan. europe has run kind of far -- the market has chosen to believe that europe's problems are somewhat behind us. i don't really share that philosophy. but i think this move is interesting. >> but the european financial risk fear indicators look great. in fact, these financial indicators look great worldwide. i agree with you trat central banks are greasing the wheels. but in a very gloomy world, a very gloomy psychology where the worst case becomes the most talked-about case, at some point don't the m
. >>> and japan's nikkei 225 reaches the 10,000 mark for the first time in eight months. stocks rally after a widening trade deficit softens the yen and heightens expectations for more stimulus. >>> we are expecting to get the latest results from germany's survey any second now. in the meantime, i can can bring you news. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect t
more competitive. meanwhile, the bank of japan was debating measures to -- joining us now, allen capper is with us around this table. when we talk about the yen, how important is this weakness? and do you expect this trade to be for 2013? >> i think this is probably the single most important thing the europeans ought to be watching. it's clear that the change in japanese policy, if by the time we get to q4 next year, you will see stronger japanese numbers, there would be a stronger temptation to carry out much more massive qe and fiscal stimulus. it's too early to say, but i think we need to watch japan carefully. >> currency wars is what ur use saying. >> absolutely. and i like his idea about fiscal stimulus through official use of the funds. it's a very interesting strategy. >> ur r it seems to me the next level of this is you have to bloef the government can achieve this. how are they going to be able to shake off inflation? >> the key look is to acknowledge that inflation is not the problem. when you talk to investors good qe, they're concerned about the inflationary impact. my mind
's happening in japan. you guys may recall yesterday it was up .9%. this market has been on a tear this year. it's up more than 20 one of the best asset classes. the yen continues to weaken. there's two reasons why we're focusing here. we got weak economic data out of japan. industrial production decline. we saw core consumer prices decline. we can show you, though, what's happening with the yen. we're seeing the new finance minister coming out and saying to other countries, you know, look, we're not trying to materially weaken our yen and you have no place to accuse us of doing so. he says a strong dollar policy would benefit the u.s. very much so. and, again, might benefit japan, too, because that will make it a lot easier to get that yen lower. today, the dollar/yen is up .2% because it's important at this junction now that we've seen the new government come in, now that we've seen the new cabinet ministers, people who were expecting a lot of fiscal and monetary magic from to look at the data overnight and be reminded that it's no guarantee japan will magically be able to rejiger its econ
hurt native species so that boat will be taken to the base yard and japan will be contacted to try if find in the owner wants it. >>> the chilling message from a man who shot and killed two firefighters. >>> and the find in the ashes of his burned out home. >>> and did he break the law on air? the journeyist under investigation. well, well, well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. snoot dow is up but the nasdaq and s and p are down even though we have the report that showed the home price index better than expected. this fiscal cliff is still making traders nervous. >>> this may turn out to be a disappointing season for retailers. any new report shows retail sales are up just 7 tenths of one
the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he interested in? what is in his head. try to place churchill in his tim times. he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of the geography, the politics, the military situati situation, was not there. and he admits in his memoirs in order to imagine a picture of a theatre of war or what have you, you have to have some knowledge to let your imagination run three. and he didn't and he admitted that and he paid dearly for it. he thought the japanese were a meek race who couldn't see well, couldn't shoot straight in an airplane, were bad fighters, would never have the tim merchantity to attack the british empire. and he people that. they will not attack us. how could they possibly contemplate that. host: what was his reaction when the japanese bombed pearl harbor? guest: that he just won the war. host: that was december 7, 1941. here he is in front of the congress joint session on the day aft
in britain, in australia, in japan. japan has the toughest gun control in the world. they have two or three murders a year. you have 11,000 to 12,000 -- >> how many suicides do they have? >> 11,000 to 12,000 murders from guns a year in america. and you still don't care, do you? >> suicides are higher in japan than they are in america. they don't use guns. they have all kinds of ways to kill themselves. and you have a different culture in england. what has hurt this country is the drugs. the drugs have changed everything. you didn't hear about these shootings when i was growing up in the '50s and '60s. and then you didn't need a background check to buy a gun. now with all the drugs, all the stuff we're treating kids with these psychotic drugs, it's causing some real problems in our community. almost all of these kids that have murdered, if you look at them, they have been treated with drugs for their mental problems. and it's changing something. it's taking away their empathy where they can do this kind of horrible thing and not feel remorse or fear or terror of what they're doing. they just
. to shame the americans. they did not do that. >> how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? >> one of the things in doing this, i had to look at what is he interested in? what is in his head? he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of geography, the politics, the military situation was not there. he admits in his memoirs in order to imagine a picture with a theatre of war or what have you, you have to have some knowledge, not let your imagination run free. he thought the japanese were a meek race, and a lot of the brits and the americans thought could not shoot straight, were bad fighters, would never have the temerity to attack the british empire. and he told people, they would never attack of ask. how could it come to that? >> and what was his reaction when the japanese bombed pearl harbor? >> that he had just won the war. he knew what that meant. >> here he is before congress the day after christmas 1944. >> wounds have been inflicted upon the nazi tyranny which have bitten deep and will fester and inflame, not only in
in 1932 -- in korea in 1932. when the north invaded, he and his family fled to japan. but in new york at the epicenter of new technology and ideas, that eventually became his home. and at a time when people were not expected to interact with technology, he invited participation. >> we have his random access, which shows the artist having read -- the constructed a real to real audio decker he invites the audience to interact with the trucks on our own with the device. >> why did he do this? and how is it relevant today? >> he was the first artist to the construct technology and give it back to west. it is a metaphor for what we're going through today with the internet and the technology that we deal with on a day-to-day basis. >> he knew that television would change the world. and his art embraces it, sometimes playfully, sometimes obscure. he defined a new visual medium that is now at the center of our to the 21st century. he was really the first person to use technology in ways that today, we take for granted. he predicted the power of television, how electronic media could bring us
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
therefore it's about them. if anybody would have made that same decision, it's not about them. japan attacks pearl harbor on december 7, 1941, franklin roosevelts has to decide if we are going to declare war on japan. we were going. >> no conceivable american politician would have declared war. >> no politician who would have become president. that's right. >> host: you pay particular attention to three presidents, thomas jefferson, abraham lincoln, you already mentioned and woodrow wilson. let's do them in chronological order. let's start with jefferson. he it a extreme president? >> guest: a model president. how they are they were evaluated before they became president. if everyone had the ability to influence whether or not they would get the job, knew everything about them. then the people have a ability to recognize the person is not what we want or the person is what we want. and they pick jefferson. if you look at jefferson's career, he had been governor of virginia, ambassador of france, secretary of state, vice president of the united states, member of the congress. author of the de
, a tunnel collapse west of tokyo raising safety questions right across japan. we're going take a look at the cave-in that left cars mangled and drivers dead. everything has to be just right. perfection is inthe details. ♪ get to holiday fun faster with pillsbury cookie dough. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enr
is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the newspapers, you feel like what else can he say? it's not going to be a day where you'll buy sterling aggressively because most of the news is going to be bad. we're going to have lower growth. potentially missing at least the underlying fiscal targets and rules. so it's not a great day for sterling. i think the bigger impact will be if the rating agencies get twitchy. then i think sterling will be a bit more vulnerable. but i don't think it's necessarily a story for this afternoon. >> we saw manufacturing came in slightly better than expect. so there risk to the upside from the pmi? >> maybe. it doesn't feel like pmis are really getting a grip on the market. we're not in a world where interest rates are going an
by naval and air forces of the empire of japan. ] hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. military families face, we understan at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. alisyn: this is fox news alert there is more tragic fallout from that radio prank today getting global attention. a british nurse duped in a hoax involving the dutchess of came ridge has been found dead in an apparent suicide. here is prince william and his pregnant wife kate leaving the hospital yesterday after she was treat ford severe morning sickness. a couple of days before a pair of australian shock jocks called the hospita
to find ways to not be dependent. have a nephew thinking -- teaching english in japan and staying there into the job market is better here. >> this comes back, we have moved off of the question of the economy. among other things when people say can we afford to spend to boost the economy, the costs of not doing that are among others things a lost generation of young people. a terrible job market, people are coming out of school or college or private school into a market that has no use for them. they never get that first job that makes use of your potential, never get started on the latter. we will be paying a price for our inaction in the face of mass unemployment for years because of what we're doing. >> absolutely right. particularly foolish right now, u.s. government can borrow at negative real interest rate. >> the u.s. government sells bonds that are protected against inflation and will not devalue and the interest rate on ten year inflation bonds at minus 0.8%. people hate government taking their money. >> once you recognize that and recognize we have higher return investme
it was actually like as opposed to learning facts about japan. the other thing, if i were in the room with you you would not be the tallest person. >> we have time for one more question. >> that did not want you to stop talking. are they ever going to legalize marijuana? >> reducing its monthly clip should since when . >> that's great. [applause] building of the capital in the '70s, a stanford white integrate architect was working on in the capital with major architects. of this would prove to be the most expensive but building on the continent, a $25 million when finished by teddy roosevelt. stanford white came around 1872 and said i have to spend another night to it in albany. of all of the one horse towns, this is the worst. but that changed when the capital went up then it became a tourist attraction. and has a an impressionistic idea of the city, articles that cover the ethnic history and every geographic neighborhood and more. it sold all over the country with the unusual development. is a phenomenon i don't understand. i discovered what a fantastic town this is. i had left albany and never
in western europe or japan? the reason is diversity of our capital markets. so bain capital go win, turnaround companies come and get good returns to pension funds for customers. public pension funds are the biggest in company pension funds and nonprofits like universities come individuals way back. so is our ability to get these, sufficient capital markets that enable us to get 50% of her time higher growth rates in europe. seelig hit europe. i do want to bore your viewers with them members but american banks lend american companies rate now about $1.4 trillion from europe that number is 6 trillion, even though the european economies as a whole are about the same size as the u.s. which you call bonded debt, or come in a skit involved in commercial paper, bonds and other sources. five chilliness country, only one in europe. that means europe is top-heavy with banks. but that means is if you're a small company and you start to grow, you don't have the capital industry we have. you don't have the diverse sources of capital here. sue eventually give forest to become part of a big comp
, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why
of consultation in the international regulators, canada, australia, japan, europe etc. and we continue to work the issue. i would say with banks registering the largest banks registered in the term, we are going to have more issues to sort through and we are committed to soaring through -- >> you are not talking of those that registered when you are making that statement. just the firms that register. >> but i have some expressions from some of the foreign regulators that they feel like some of the guidance may be in conflict with their loan regulator, their own that regulation and i guess that is what i am saying. if they are in conflict how are you dealing with those conflicts? >> the one example was in japan they have a clearing requirement. they actually put in place november 1st and we now have a requirement that we finished in november. there is a conflict because we both say they have to be cleared and registered clearinghouses. yet they have yet to register the london clearing house and we have yet to register the japanese clearing house. we are relieved they can use the japanese clear
. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, shares seem to be fwllat. bundesbank announced it had cut its growth outlook for the country. in the u.s., the nasdaq snapped its losing streak yesterday with its first gain in five days. the dow was on pace for its third straight weekly gain. u.s. equity futures at this hour -- we don't have them. maybe joe has them. >> steve, you are here because it's jobs friday. are you here representing c innocent objects t cnbc or the bls? >> i'm representing myself actually. >> good to have you. in corporate news, netflix, regula
asia, clearly, it has bruised people, governments across the region here, south korea and japan, and in recent days, reportedly pressing for an increase in the u.n. security council sanctions to the level currently imposed on iran. we don't know if they will get there, but tension is on the u.n. right now. china has a veto power there. china's patience was taxed with this launch, the foreign ministry spokesman expressing regret, which is a strong word from beijing. but it is unclear what measures china would accept as means of punishment of north korea. greta? >> greta: do you know why the window was extended for this launch and then they launched it? is there any explaining for that, yet? >> it could have been a measure by thome confuse and throw everything off the track. yesterday, local time, local media said that the rocket was being dismantled -- sorry, two days ago, saying it was dismantled from the launch pad, perhaps for repairs. a couple of hours later, it was put back and the launch took place, perhaps without south korean media and the government there watching, parti
. >> the more guns america has, the more gun murders occur. in japan where they have almost zero guns, they have almost zero gun murders. and the parallels are there all around the world. i don't get why the nra can get away with statements like this, and there isn't just a huge outcry. >> we'll see. i think things have changed somewhat. they remain a very powerful group. they're speaking to a constituency that really believes in their message, and historically, at least, that you cross the nra at your peril as a politician. they have a great deal of money. they have a great deal of influence. politicians care deeply about getting a high rating from the nra. you know, it could be that newtown marks a turning point, but it also could be that it doesn't and that's why you have not seen a huge rush of politicians to embrace gun control in the past week. >> let me understand, michael steele called the nra statement very haunting and very disturbing. he's actually an nra supporting. michael blook brg called it beyond believe that following the newtown tragedy, the national rifle association wants to
's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> about 22 past the hour now. the first hint of snow is falling in pennsylvania. it will be heading to the northeast, weather channel meteorologist mike seidel live in new cumberland, pennsylvania. what are you seeing? what do we expect the next couple of days? >> light snow on the pennsylvania turnpike outside of harrisburg. travel fine, not that cold and hasn't snowed that much. this will be the first measurable snowfall for philadelphia. may get an inch of snow. new york city, times square, a couple of inches or so on the grassy services. 5 to 7. a winter storm for boston and snow will fall from dinner time to early on sunday morning. the areas where you got dumped wednesday morning, buffalo, syracuse, look for 3 to 6 inches, not the 10 to 15 you had. the major impact at the airports, already the three new york city airports, newark, laguardia, and kennedy, canceled 180 fli
in the presidency? increasing concentration of power. there's the catastrophe in japan. in the united states, they immediately want to say what's the president doing? what's he saying? what's the policy? what's the action. thirty years august, that would be a question, but it would not be a central question. presidents have the -- amazing what they can do. obama has more power than bush had, for instance. >> yet, i believe it's your view we know less about our presidents, less about the inner workings of the white house. why is that? is that our fault? >> well, it is, in part, our fault, and the managers in the white house get better and better and more skillful, and that it's a bearier -- barrier often, and god knows how much time i spent breaking down, breaking that log jam ?t white house saying i'm doing this book, i've got stories, i got memos. i got these notes to answer questions. it's not something where they are standing there on pennsylvania avenue saying to the reporters, come on, we're dying to have you hold us accountable for what we are doing. >> now, you do manage to break peop
of the war that ended with the united states, and power europe and japan on their backs to the u.s. dollar what as the international system currency did not make it a very vital it's not just fun to deal it's the settlement in world war ii and the superpower status in the international economy. the dominant party might be called regime party because they are able to use their political strength to carry forward the basic theme around which the political settlements were organized. jefferson's party looks to the blues and democracy expansion and the freedom and capitalism, fdr the themes of national regulation and internationalism and in this sense the united states has had a two-party system rather one-and-a-half party system assisting the regime party and the competitive forced to adapt is now on the position. the competitors in the 1840's that democrats after the civil war and the republicans in the postwar era won the national elections but only after accepting the legitimacy with the basic political fema established by the regime party. it's interesting to read the platforms and the de
, they don't have these same shoot problems. if you like at japan, they have the most vicious, violent video games of anybody, and they don't have these issues. they don't have a murder rate. >> guess what? tell your hollywood friends, we got hundreds of millions of guns on the street. we ain't japan, so you fight the war on the battlefield before you and the battlefield before us is there is easy access to guns. there will be easy access to guns regardless of what gun safety legislation. >> to parents while i still have control, because you lose it as they get older, don't let them do it. find something else. it's hard. it's easier said than done because a lot of kids sit there for hours and it's their baby-sitter, but no. >> steve, i understand that's not your position, but i'm hearing this a lot of from people in hollywood. no response. quentin tarantino was unbelievable incense it actisen. what a total jackass. left wingers say i want to -- there's a slippery slope on first amendment rights. >> it's always a mistake to do exactly what you want to do when in this kind of situation. you ha
killed with them. it's obvious complete nonsense. in japan, they have the toughest gun control laws in the world. they have about two to ten murders a year from guns. when are you going to do the proper math and stop telling people that the number of guns has no correlation to gun murders? it is blatantly obvious. >> it's the total homicide rate i was talking about, and when you create conditions of gun scarcity like you have in the united kingdom, you create conditions that make it easy for criminals. one of the reasons that the united kingdom has an astronomical burglary rate compared to the united states is because uk burglars have no fears of getting shot by the homeowner. according to the united nations, scotland is the most violent industrialized country in the world. one of the reasons scotland is so violent is because the government in london has disabled the scots from being able to protect themselves against violent criminals. >> look me in the eye down this camera lens and tell me scotland is more dangerous than america, when you have 12,000 gun murders a year and 300 mil
to finance it because we get our money, right now, from china. we can't get it from japan. we can't get it from europe. we have $16 trillion in debt. back to the fiscal cliff, we went by. >> that's out of the way. >> you jumped the shark. you mentioned the dreaded cliff word. i'm cutting you all off. carol, abby, charles, thank you. you've been one of the most lively panels and the most aesthetically pleasing since yesterday. >>> when it comes to guns, my next guest knows it all-too well. gabby giffords husband, astronaut mark kelly. coming up next. [ sniffs ] i have a cold. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! capella university understands back from rough economic times. employees are being forced to do more with less. and the need for capable leaders is greater than ever. when you see these problems do you take a step b
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